Friday, December 10, 2010

Meet newest members of Anxiety Wrap’s Charity Foster Program

Meet the newest members of the Anxiety Wrap’s Charity Foster Program: Stevie, Tippy, Miss B and Chico. We do more than donate dollars and provide Anxiety Wraps to needy organizations. We give time, training, socialization and shelter to dogs who are down on their luck and need help with finding loving, forever homes.

Tippy lived about 1 mile from our Anxiety Wrap Company and as many storm-fearing dogs often do, he would leave home during a storm in an attempt to find relief. Luckily for Tippy, he found his way to our facility during storms instead of coming into harm’s way. We recognized his fear as storm fear, put an Anxiety Wrap on him and watched as he lay down and went to sleep. As soon as the storm ended, Tippy would get up and go to the door to signal us it was time to go home. If it began raining in the middle of the night he would scratch on the door of our center’s adjoining apartment, which one of our trainers occupied. She would let him in the office, put his Anxiety Wrap on him (he has his own) and he would go to sleep. Recently we asked Tippy’s previous owner to consider allowing us to re-home him where he would live inside with lots of love. Fortunately they relinquished him and he stayed with us until the right match was found.  Tippy now lives with a retired lady who lavishes him with love.

Stevie’s owners asked for help with his hyperactivity. One of our trainers observed that he lived in a crate nearly 24 hours a day and scratched himself until he developed sores. Our trainer offered to take Stevie since, while his owner wanted to keep him, it was clear he wasn’t receiving the environment he needed. After a few weeks, the owner called and agreed to relinquish Stevie to our care. We accepted Stevie into our program and he’s been enjoying life with other dogs and staff members. His skin has completely cleared up and he’s in good health. He’s 20-months and friendly to all creatures from dogs to kittens. We are still in the process of finding him the right home. If you’re interested please give us a call at 877.652.1266.

Chico was found with a shoestring tied around his neck, tethered to a fence in 90 degree heat with no water or food. A wonderful woman not only rescued Chico, but found his owners and got them to relinquish their rights. She took Chico and fostered him until we took over his care and placed him with a wonderful retired gentleman. Chico now lives in luxury. This 7-lb Rat Terrier hit gold as all dogs should do!

Miss B. came to us from a local Indiana humane society and now has a loving home.

Watch Tippy, Stevie and Miss B romp and play together.

Thursday, November 11, 2010

Tips to Use When Working with Anxious Dogs

Dogs live in strong social structures and avoid conflict by using body posture and signals. Turid Rugaas, an internationally renowned dog trainer and writer, studied wolf packs and observed the calming signals they use with each other. She wrote an excellent book on dog communication, titled, “On Talking Terms With Dogs.” During any work or interaction with anxious or stressed dogs (such as those in animal shelters), it would be good to incorporate a few of these communication skills:

  • Turn your head slightly away from your dog. In dog body language, staring or worse, hard staring, is a threat. 
  • Yawn with head turned slightly away. This is a way to communicate you are attempting to calm the situation.
  • Lick the side of your lip with head slightly turned. Lip licking can also be interpreted as non-threatening.

All these may sound silly until you realize your dog may do the same thing back to you. Even if she doesn’t, you’re still communicating things are ok, safe, no need to be concerned. Never coddle, try to sooth, or become worried, anxious, or upset yourself. If you are worried, anxious and upset, the dog will read your body language and become more anxious. Coddling or trying to sooth the anxious dog may cause the dog’s adrenaline to increase and work against calming. Next time you observe a group of dogs together – especially if they’re meeting each other for the first time – observe their body language and learn!

Thursday, November 4, 2010

Susan's Tips for Preventing Dog Bites: For Children and Adults

Susan Sharpe, inventor of Anxiety Wrap, offers these tips for children and adults to prevent dog bites:


Unfortunately, children are the victims of most serious dog bites. It is very important that adults understand what to do and not to do when they are with dogs and pass this along to the children in their lives.

Never run up to a dog, even one you know.

Never scream or run around a dog, even your own.

Don’t sneak up on a dog, especially when he is sleeping or eating.

Children should never go up to any dog without an adult.

Don't stare into the eyes of a dog, and let him sniff your hand before you pet him.

Pet the dog under his chin, on his chest or on his back, not his head.

Stand still if a dog approaches you. Stop, put your bike down, and stand still if you are riding. Don't try to run or ride away!

If a dog is growling or showing his teeth, don't go up to him even if he is with his owner.

Don't try to pet a dog through a fence, even if he is your friend.

Leave mother dogs with their puppies alone. She might try and protect them from you.

Wrestling, chase, and tug games are not good games for kids to play with dogs.

Hitting and teasing dogs, pulling their ears, tails and feet are very dangerous.

Let an adult know if there is a loose dog running around.

If a dog threatens you, don't look into his eyes, scream or run. Instead, hold a jacket or book bag in front of you and slowly back away.

If a dog does attack you, roll up like a ball and put your hands behind your neck.

Dogs perceive situations as safe or dangerous: if they feel a situation is dangerous they will defend themselves, often with a bite. Help the children understand so that their experiences with dogs will be all positive!

Tip of the week: Avoid bending over dogs, especially shy or anxious ones. A person can appear awfully big and intimidating hovering above them. Until then, keep those tails a waggin'
"Copyright 2010 Animals Plus, LLC"

Tuesday, November 2, 2010

What You Should Know About the Calming Face Wrap

Calming Face Wrap

Some dogs suffer more serious storm fear and the Face Wrap, which is NOT a muzzle in any way can be used in conjunction with the Anxiety Wrap to comfortably reduce the dog's fear and anxiety.  It's completely comfortable and in fact the dog could easily paw it off, but usually doesn't until after the storm has passed.

The Face Wrap works via maintained pressure and 2-acupressure points. One over the bridge of the dog's nose and the second one at the back of the dog's head.

The Face Wrap is used in conjunction with the Anxiety Wrap for those dogs suffering more serious storm fear. I.e. scratching the floor, their people or furniture as well as dogs who bark at or chase the storm. Also in the case of the dog climbing upward (on tables or mantles), destructive behavior or trying to escape the storm.  

Monday, November 1, 2010

You Might Have Missed Susan's WikiHow Article: How to Calm a Dog During Thunderstorms

Susan wrote:

Millions of dogs suffer from thunderstorm fear and experience symptoms that range from panting, pacing, and shaking to causing damage to the home or worse, injury to themselves. Susan Sharpe, APDT, CPDT-KA, a 25 year dog trainer, owner of Canine Companions and inventor of The Anxiety Wrap, offers tips to help owners and dogs cope...

Read Susan's 3 Steps to Calm Your Dog During Thunderstorms.




Friday, October 29, 2010

The Pets Place on Dogs Behaving Badly During Storms

Susi Szeremy at The Pets Place blog talks about dogs behaving badly during storms (and 4th of July celebrations). . .

June is typically the start of storm season in many parts of the country. Statistically, the number of dogs dropped off at animal shelters rises immediately after a thunder storm, possibly because owners are ill equipped to deal with pets who are traumatized by thunder and lightening. In this article, I discuss causes and solutions for dogs who react badly to storms and loud sounds like firecrackers...

On Anxiety Wrap as a potential solution, she says:


Hug Therapy includes “Body wrapping” that seems to calm and focus some anxious and stressed dogs. Neurobiologists believe that trauma can damage nerve receptors, leading to exaggerated responses to stimuli. By applying constantly maintained pressure, a wrap provides a quieting stimulus that causes the receptors to adapt and modify their thresholds in a cumulative manner. A variety of techniques for “wrapping” a dog range from using T-shirts to elastic bandage wraps. Or, consider using the Anxiety Wrap — a sturdy, stretchy vest that hugs the torso like a body stocking and comes in a variety of sizes. This item is said to work so well that it’s been successfully used for separation anxiety, car-sickness, hyperactivity and many other behavioral quirks. Look for it on the Internet.

Read the complete blog here.

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

A Dog's Eye View of Halloween and Anxiety Wrap

Halloween is a time for dress up, tricks and treats. It’s great fun for humans, but may not be a good night for our dogs.

Most dogs do not like playing dress-up. Putting a costume on your dog may look cute, but is the dog comfortable? Many dogs are uncomfortable with and even afraid of suddenly being forced into wearing hats & clothing of any kind. If you want your dog to wear a costume make sure the outfit is flame retardant and freely allows the dog to breathe, see and hear. He needs to be comfortable with it so a bit of work on your part is required. Gradually desensitize the dog to wearing the costume before going greeting the public. To do this put the costume on the dog while giving him some tasty treats. Repeat this several times until he comes to associates wearing a costume gets him great treats! Remove small or dangling pieces he might chew or swallow and avoid rubber bands.

If you’re wanting your dog to be part of greeting trick-or-treaters, you should know most dogs are too excited or fearful to remain well mannered at the door. When a dog is over stimulated or fearful it's not fun for the dog, even if that tail is wagging! The truth is, most dogs are stressed by Halloween activities and the interruption of their routine. An ordinarily well-mannered dog may feel threatened enough by oddly dressed and acting strangers at the door to growl, bark, lunge or even bite. Do your dog a huge favor and put an Anxiety Wrap on him or her 20 to 30-minutes before the trick or treaters start ringing your doorbell and leave it on throughout the evening's activities. You should also consider putting him in another room with a food stuffed toy, but at the very least allow him to roam the house freely wearing his Anxiety Wrap, and never force him to join you at the door! The freedom to remove himself from the activity is necessary for him to feel safe. Think about it, if you were unsure of someone or something would you feel better if you were pulled closer to the scary thing or person or would you feel better if you were free to back up and keep your distance. Of course the answer is, you would feel better being allowed to approach if and when you felt comfortable with the situation. It's the same thing for your dog. The Anxiety Wrap adds to the dog's comfort by via maintained pressure and acupressure, which gives your dog a safe long lasting hug creating a safer internal feeling. Remember once the Anxiety Wrap is on your dog stop interacting with him so not to get him excited which could override the its effectiveness.

More tips: Before the night begins, confirm the dog’s I.D. tags are up-to-date and exercise him with a long walk prior to any trick-or-treaters arriving. While on the walk be aware you may meet costumed children and adults. Most dogs will be afraid of not only the odd costumes, but also the scary movements costume wearers like to make. It’s a time of year where people try to scare others, including dogs, so be sure to give any ghouls a wide berth. If the weather is comfortable in your area, put the Anxiety Wrap before and during the walk to increase your dog's comfort level. If you live in an area where it is still hot outside wet the Anxiety Wrap with cold water and it will act as a cooling agent in addition to calming your dog. Once back home keep your dog indoors because dogs are known to be taunted and teased, when left outside. When this happens some dogs become so frightened they run away in an effort to remain safe.

Remember, no candy for the dog and be sure to keep the candy bowl out of the dogs reach at all times. Explain to everyone (including children) how dangerous candy is to dogs. Chocolate is particularly dangerous to dogs, causing cardiac problems or even death and is found in many Halloween goodies. If you have any reason to suspect your dog ingested chocolate, check with your Veterinarian right away. Here are some of the symptoms: excessive drooling and urination; pupil dilation; rapid heartbeat; vomiting, diarrhea; hyperactivity; muscle tremors, seizures or coma.

Halloween is a night of fun for kids, but definitely not the best night of the year for dogs. Although with proper planning, and the Anxiety Wrap you and your dog will do just fine.

Monday, September 27, 2010

Face Wrap: It Can Work For Your Pet


Does your dog suffer from thunderstorm fear?  Car anxiety?  Excessive unwanted barking?  Face Wrap may be your answer.

While we are 'technically' into the fall season, thunderstorms can continue to rumble across nearly every part of the country.  A common fear and anxiety with many dogs is the fear of thunderstorms.  The loud rumbles of thunder are often times unsettling to them, causing them to pace, scratch at the floor and even more severe destructive behavior. Face Wrap can be used in conjunction with Anxiety Wrap to comfortably reduce the dog's fear and anxiety. 

It's important to point out that the Face Wrap is NOT a muzzle in any way.  It's completely comfortable and in fact a dog could easily paw it off with ease.  Face Wrap works via maintained pressure and two acupressure points;  one over the bridge of the dog's nose and the second one at the back of the dog's head.  The maintained pressure is the key calming element that makes Face Wrap so successful. 

Face Wrap has also proven to be successful with car anxiety. Simply slip the flexible, comfortable wrap in place, along with the appropriate anxiety wrap for the dog's size.  This combination reduces and even ends drooling, barking and more. 



For unwanted barking, Face Wrap could be the answer you've been looking for!  Every Face Wrap comes with easy to follow step-by-step instructions. 

To learn more about Face Wrap and Anxiety Wrap products, visit our website. You will find all the information you need to understand how the wraps work.  While there, click on the testimonials link and read many great success stories for yourself. 

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Thumbs and Paws Up for Face Wrap

We are always thrilled when we come across a blog that sings the praises of our products.  Most recently, we came across Following Pips Pawprints, a wonderful blog that shares the life and times of a growing Border Collie. 

Pip's owner, Barb describes in her blog that Pip had a bit of a barking problem and tried the Face Wrap.  Here is part of what Barb shared with her readers: 

"I had heard good reports on this product called The Face Wrap. One of my colleagues had video of a barking Pom who magically quieted after the Face Wrap was put on. I had actually tried it with a client's dog who was a fearful barker and didn't have a lot of success with it, but I believe it's because the dog was already over his threshold when we put it on.

I have to report that it worked like a dream with Pip. A couple days before the workshop I desensitized her to it by feeding a liver treat whenever it appeared. Then I had her touch it with her nose and get a treat. Finally I laid it over her nose and fed her through the loop. When she was happy about seeing the Face Wrap come toward her, I criss-crossed it under her chin and snapped it behind her ears. Lots of treats then. She didn't fight it as much as I thought she would. When she laid down calmly with it, she got treats. When she fussed about it, I walked away.

During our workshop sessions when the dogs were crated, I alternated having her wear it and go without it. There was a definite difference when she had it on - she was calm and laid down during the sessions. When she wasn't wearing it, she was sitting up, staring at me and barking."


Pip looking happy wearing the Face Wrap

What a wonderful testimonial to the benefits of Face Wrap.  We would like to thank Barb for using Face Wrap and sharing her success with her readers. 

We'll be following Pip and the adventures that growing up can bring!

Thursday, September 16, 2010

Newest Additions To Our Charity Foster Program

Animals are important to us. We do more than just donate money to the cause of animal welfare. We spay, neuter, vaccinate, foster, train, and find great homes for countless numbers of all kinds of animals! And it’s all sponsored by every Anxiety Wrap purchase! In addition to donating Anxiety Wraps and providing funding to shelters & other rescue groups, we, at The Original Anxiety Wrap company, also give our time, effort and skills.

Our foster program includes housing the dog at our training facility where he or she joins doggie daycare for socialization and great exercise!  Daycare includes a 6-acre fenced field, as well as an inside heated and air-conditioned area complete with 1-inch thick matting on the floor for health & safety. At night our foster dogs either sleep in our office (therapeutic dog mattresses) or with the trainer who lives in our adjoining apartment, or they’re placed in the home of one of our trainers and/or skilled foster volunteers. Wherever the dog stays they are integrated into family life, including other dogs, cats, kids and more.

We recently had two new additions to our Charity Foster Program.  We'd like you to meet Addie and Just  Jack
 
Addie

Addie is 10 yrs of age.  No bad habits - likes to be outside when it's nice and travels well. Sweet dog to both people and animals.  Doesn't bark and appears to be house trained. A little shy, but that's to be expected as her world has been turned upside down in the last 24-hrs. 

Just Jack

Just Jack is a 5-yrs old -  Minpin/Jack Russell/& more - excellent health.  Jack has barked twice when the other dogs barked and is house trained. Likes to play ball, shake hands  and jumps into your lap on cue. Friendly to both humans and animals. Weighs approximately 20-lbs and travels well.  This dog could do it all, from tricks to Broadway, he's athletic and a quick learner!

We have every confidence that these two adorable dogs will be placed in a great, loving home.  

Your purchase of Anxiety Wrap helps us help them.   

Wednesday, September 8, 2010

Meet Ginger

Ginger is a beautiful dog that unfortunately dealt with her anxiety through avoidance. She would pace endlessly when she became anxious.  Watch how Anxiety Wrap helped Ginger become less anxious and as a matter of fact, so relaxed, she decided to lay down!


Tuesday, September 7, 2010

Anxiety Wrap Mentioned in The Whole Dog Journal

We are thrilled that Anxiety Wrap was mentioned in the September 2010 issue of The Whole Dog Journal!

Dog trainer and expert, Pat Miller, CPDT-KA, CDBC mentions Anxiety Wrap as an effective tool to help reduce stress in the September article, "Really Obsessed.  True Obsessive Compulsive Behavior Disorders Are Anything But Cute." 

We are so pleased with Pat's mention!

Pet owners contact us on a regular basis with their praise for the Anxiety Wrap.  To see what others are saying about Anxiety Wrap and the changes it made to their pets lives (and theirs!), please see the testimonials on our website

Thursday, July 29, 2010

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The Original Anxiety Wrap Case History - Toby

This is an actual example from one of our clients who is noticing more and more improvement in her dog's unwanted behavior.  The Anxiety Wrap was ordered for Toby in on April 17th of 2010 to address his aggressive reaction to different stimuli.  It's now been 3-months and a big pat on the back goes to his owners for their commitment to their dog and consistency in using the Anxiety Wrap and the free treatment program that was provided with the Anxiety Wrap purchase.  Here is our survey question and the client's own words to describe her dog's unwanted behavior.

Dog's name: Toby
Breed: Rottweiler/German Shepherd
Age: 3 1/2 yrs.
Weight: 80 lbs

 What is your dog's issue/s that created the need for the Anxiety Wrap? He goes from completely relaxed to 100 % motion.....i.e." running to the window to bark at a dog or human walking outside. He is easily upset when on a walk when there is something different than he has seen.....like a parked truck, a piece of paper, of course, another dog. He has broken the "o" ring on his collar to take off after another dog and bitten him on the tail. He tries to pull away from my husband when they walk when another dog comes along.....sometimes. He is quick to pick up on another dog's aggressive energy, even if the other dog is not displaying any aggression.
3. How long has your dog suffered from this issue?
4. What other treatments have been tried and what were their results? We've used "Bark Busters", public classes, a K-9 dog trainer and another personal dog trainer. 

Sent: Friday, May 07, 2010 11:36 AM

Good morning Susan,

This is so long that you may want to grab a cup of coffee first.................

This is an update on Toby and the Anxiety Wrap.

    We bought the anxiety wrap and face wrap for Toby in April. Toby's issues have been anxiety that he expresses with the following:

Extreme reaction to anything different on his walk route: a truck that wasn't there yesterday, cows in the pasture along side the road, another dog, a piece of paper flying in the wind.........you get the idea. When he sees these unfamiliar things, he tries to get to them by lunging very quickly. He is very strong..........85 lbs of intense rottie/shepherd mix. He is my husband's dog. I don't walk him. 

      One day on his walk, there were two men each walking a dog on a leash. Toby lunged at one of the dogs, breaking the "O" ring on the Cesar Milan double collar. My husband didn't know he broke the "O" ring and got Toby back on his collar. He, once again, broke away and bit one dog on his butt by his tail. That particular dog was known to be aggressive in his younger days, but is no longer that way.

    Another time the trainer we've hired for Toby brought one of her Dutch Shepherd female dogs who has an aggressive nature, but is well trained. The idea was to see if Toby would react to her dog's aggressive energy and he did. He tried to get to her, but my husband held him back.

    About 7 months ago, I took Toby for a walk, thinking I could control him. Ten minutes later, my husband came along and Toby sprinted to him, dragging me along the gravel. I was unable to control him and nearly fell.

    I should tell you that we have been dog people for a long time....over 40 years. All of our dogs have attended numerous training classes, three of them have been certified as Therapy Dogs...all rescue dogs.....but we've never had a Toby before. He has baffled us. He has been through 3 levels of group training. In one class, the excitement got very high as they were doing recalls. Toby was attached to a plastic rope which was hooked to a post in the ground. Another dog (65 lbs) was doing its recall, when that dog decided to run right past its owner and to a little dog who was attached to an in ground post nearby. Toby got excited by all the commotion and broke the plastic rope and went after the bigger dog, whom he bit.  All the dogs got separated and class went on, but not without a lot of feelings floating all around. The dog Toby bit was not hurt badly enough for Vet care, but that was the last group class Toby took.

    If there is a common thread in all that Toby does, it is that he very quickly gets into a state of high excitement, the hair on his back rises up and he can get aggressive. We added another dog to our household last November under the guidance of our trainer. She is another rescue dog, a boxer mix, 2 years old. She & Toby are great pals. They play together & take naps draped over each other's bodies. The Boxer mix is my dog and is now certified as a Therapy Dog.

    Our dogs live their lives in our house or on our huge deck. We don't have a fenced in yard. When Toby sees anything from the deck: a person, another dog, a bird....he goes into a frenzied barking. The hair on the back of his neck goes straight up. If I am home, I go to him and call him with treats in hand to distract him and get him in the house. He pays no attention to me. If I want to get him in the house, I have to grab his collar and put it on and take him away........when he doesn't want to come he'll evade me by running right past me and circle around to go back to his past where he saw the object he was barking at. He is such a strong boy that once he ran right into me and broke my toe......barefoot me. When he is in that state and I try to grab him, I flips his head around as if he'd like to bite me, but he knows better because we've been through that & he knows he's get a huge scolding, so I can see he's rethinks his "I'd like to bite her" notion and turn back to what he's barking at. I am not afraid of Toby.........we have an understanding that I am his boss.

    OMG, I know this is a very long description.........if you've gotten this far you deserve a medal.  Jan

 
 

Sent: Saturday, July 03, 2010 11:35 AM

Hi Susan,

    Remember Toby? We got the Anxiety Wrap sometime back in May. I emailed you that we noticed a slight difference in Toby, mainly that it was possible to distract him when he got riled up when a dog went by.  He has made steady progress...in little steps.

    Well, yesterday, our neighbors came to their vacant home for a week and brought their dogs. Normally Toby would get all riled up and bark incessantly at them. We would then bring him in the house so he wouldn't disturb them so much. (Our homes are barely 20 ft. apart). The neighbors called our attention to the fact that Toby was being much calmer than he had been in the past and that this time it was their dogs that were causing all the barking noise. Toby was just watching. They asked me if we were doing anything to train him. I told them about the Anxiety Wrap and that he also does 45 minutes on the treadmill twice a day. Those things, along with our constant training are paying off. Thought you'd like to know.....Jan

 

Sent: Wednesday, July 28, 2010 2:13 PM

Hi Susan

Here are 3 pics to choose from. I would tell you that Toby doesn't like his anxiety wrap as he lies down when he sees me coming with it, though he is cooperative in putting it on. But in one of these pics, it appears he has a smile on his face.......doesn't it? He continues to become a more mellow boy......and as I said before, I can now call him back to me when he's gotten excited with a dog outside & runs to the Dining Room window to peer out. The hair on his back goes UP as well as his tail and he BARKS loudly. I can call him back and he'll turn to me and then come for his treat...... he'll still be excited, but at least he'll come. We put him in his crate when we have lots of company, as he will get very excited jump up on them until he settles down. He loves people.

As you can see, Toby is a Rottie/shepherd mix.....he weighs 80 lbs and is 3 1/2 years old. We've had him since he was 8 weeks old. The other dog is Sami, our boxer mix, a rescue dog we got last October. She is 2 1/2 years old. Since we got her I've taken her to training classes and she has become certified as a Therapy Dog. she now works at our local library as a reading dog. We'll start the same program in our local elementary school when school resumes in a couple of weeks. Sami & Toby are good pals....... when they play/roughhouse together, if it gets kind of dicey, I'll call to them (Hey, you guys, what are you doing?....Leave it!) and Toby will be the first to stop....then he'll walk away.  Jan

 

 July 29, 2010 11:22 AM
To: Susan Sharpe
Subject: More Toby News

Good Morning Susan,

    Something just happened that is phenomenal..........I never thought this would happen. Twice this morning, people walked by our house with their dogs and Toby didn't react at all! He went to the dining room window to peer out, but he didn't bark. I happened to be sitting at my computer in our office and noticed the dog walkers. I heard barking  but it was coming from our boxer mix, my Therapy dog, Sami, who was outside on the back deck. She is in the picture I sent you of Toby. Toby didn't bark at all! I actually went out the front door to see the 2nd dog walker. Toby was at the window, and didn't utter a sound. He didn't try to get outside with me. He just stood there.  This is a first and I am very glad. If I'm going to be very scientific about this and try to figure out what made the difference, I have to say, it could be two things: he's getting older (3 1/2) and the daily use of the Anxiety Wrap. I put it on him for about 30 minutes once a day. I really think the Anxiety Wrap gets most of the credit.

    Did I tell you another Toby milestone? There are ducks that wander around our neighborhood.......1 female and 3 males. They waddle around people's front yards, back yards and patios down by the water. Lately they've been outside when my husband takes Toby for his morning walk. He notices them and then ignores them.......doesn't lunge for them or even bark. This is also new behavior. Wow, I think we're finally getting somewhere with our big lovable boy. He is showing times when he can be a perfect gentleman........Jan

 

 

 

Friday, July 23, 2010

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 The Anxiety Wrap(tm) Charity Foster Program
Animals Plus, LLC, makers of the Original Anxiety Wrap, does more than just donate a dollar. In addition to donating Anxiety Wraps and providing funding to shelters & other rescue groups, we also give our time, effort and skills. We spay, neuter, vaccinate, foster, train, and find great homes for countless numbers of all kinds of animals! And it’s all sponsored by Anxiety Wrap purchases!  This photo shows Roxie, the boxer, meeting her new family.  She was fostered by Susan Sharpe, inventor of The Anxiety Wrap, and was placed in a new home to be a companion for this young man with severe disabilities.

The Anxiety Wrap ends thunderstorm fear, separation anxiety, jumping and persistent barking by using the gentle methods of Maintained Pressure (first utilized by Temple Grandin) and Acupressure.  It's the only patented pressure wrap invented by a dog trainer and has been used by veterinarians, trainers, behaviorists and pet owners around the world for the past 9 years.  Featured on The Today Show, Animal Planet's "It's Me or the Dog" with trainer Victoria Stillwell and on Tracie Hotchner's "Dog Talk" SiriusXM radio show on the Martha Stewart Living channel.  www.anxietywrap.com.  877-652-1266.

Additional Info if there's space:
Our foster program includes housing the dog at our training facility where he/she joins doggie daycare for socialization and great exercise!  Daycare includes a 6-acre fenced field and an inside heated and air-conditioned area with 1-inch thick matting on the floor for health & safety.  At night our foster dogs either sleep in our office (therapeutic dog mattresses) or with the trainer who lives in our adjoining apartment, or they’re placed in the home of one of our trainers and/or skilled foster volunteers. Wherever the dog stays he/she is integrated into family life, including other dogs, cats, kids and more.

We’ve also fostered and found homes for cats and one bird, which was eventually released. Of course, there are far too many animals and only a small fraction of these are placed in good homes each year. Please be responsible by spaying or neutering your pet!

 

Monday, July 19, 2010

Treat For Training!

 

Dogs will be more likely to repeat the behavior that got him the better treat, for this reason we use very good treats and require our clients to do the same while in our classes.  Homemade treats are often the tastiest to dogs plus we do not use food/treats that contain dyes.  PLEASE feed one small treat at a time and treating a dog is reserved only for rewarding the dog while he/she’s working/learning.

 

Liver Treats

Thick cut beef liver

Partially frozen

Sprinkle garlic on both sides

Microwave on both sides for 3.5 minutes (total of 7 minutes)

Cut into small pieces or strips and piece off.

Freeze and use as needed

 

Poultry & Fish

10 oz can of chicken

10 oz can of turkey

10 oz can of tuna

2 eggs

3 teaspoons of garlic powder

1.3/4 cup of flour more or less to make a stiff dough

Mix together and press flat on cookie sheet about 1/4 “ thick

Bake 250 degree for 30 minutes

Cut into quarters and turn over and bake another 15 minutes

Cut into cubes or strips, refrigerate and freeze

 

Hotdog:  Micro-wave and cut into pieces or strips, adding garlic is usually welcomed.

Kitten chow: 1 piece or less equals a treat

String Cheese:  pinch or allow the dog to gentle piece off a small amount of cheese.

 

Liver Brownies [WARNING: this recipe contains corn meal]

1 Jiffy mix - any flavor except chocolate (I have substituted oatmeal occasionally)

1 lb beef liver (include the "juices")

1 Egg

Garlic powder

Mix all ingredients in food processor and bake in a shallow pan for about 10 minutes at 350

 

Liver Leather

1 lb (2 cups) beef or chicken livers

1 cup tapioca flour or starch

Preheat the oven to 250

Puree the liver in a food processor.  Add the tapioca flour or starch and mix well.  Line a baking sheet with foil and lightly grease it.  our the mixture onto the baking sheet and bake for 70 minutes or until firm on top and uniformly brown on the bottom.  Place baking sheet on cooling rack and let sit until coo enough to handle.  Peel off the foil and cut into small pieces with a pizza cutter.  Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator

Autumn’s Liver Jerky Bites - The key to these ugly, but tasty, jerky bites are boiling the liver before you bake it.  Cut the treats to whatever size please you and your dog.  Once cooked, they are not easy to break into smaller pieces.  The liver will look shrunken and charred, but your dog will not mind.1-pound (2 cups) (more or less as desired) beef or chicken liver.Cut the liver into bite sized pieces.  Place in a saucepan and cover with water. Bring water to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer for three minutes.  Drain the water and place pieces of liver on a baking sheet covered with greased or non-stick foil.  Bake the liver for two hours (longer if pieces are large).  Store at room temperature in a loosely covered container.

 

 

 

 

 

blog

Frantic dogs may need the swaddling of a wrap

Posted: July 9, 2010 - 12:19am  |  Updated: July 9, 2010 - 3:18am

At this time of year, we begin to hear stories from our clients about their dog's fear of loud noises.

Usually, the pet has exhibited these fears all year, but with our summer afternoon thunderstorms, clients have the issue more predominately on their minds.

Typically, they come to us asking for tranquilizers to calm the dog. This is not the best solution in most cases. Tranquilizers need to be given a few hours before the event and should not be given daily.

With our clients who work, the dilemma of not knowing when to use the medication becomes an issue in itself.

Summer storms are so unpredictable that it is hard to know when they might pop up. We have had clients come home to a house that looks like it has been ransacked because their dog was frantic trying to get away from a bad storm or fireworks.

My own dog is only mildly agitated by loud noises. Over the years, we have learned to put on soothing music and place her in an interior room without windows on the Fourth of July. That seems to work just fine for her.

However, my sister's dog has increasingly become a basket case when she visits. (We also have to deal with Fort Stewart during bombing exercises.)

This got me thinking how, as a new grandmother, I had been intrigued with the thoughts being presented to parents on swaddling newborns and babies.

The wraps seem to help relax and lull babies to sleep. I had seen wraps for horses and had read some on the subject in our veterinary journals. So, I recommended to my sister to try a wrap for her dog.

The Anxiety Wrap (www.anxietywrap.com) was developed by a professional dog trainer. The light pressure of the garment is meant to target points on the dog's body to give a calming effect and release tension.

My sister tried the wrap on her 11-year-old Australian Shepherd who would hide in the closet during storms or loud noises.

This is my sister's story:

"The wrap fit perfectly and she didn't mind wearing it. I got to test it out several nights later when there was a storm. The storm was some distance away and, at first, I thought maybe she was losing her hearing because she wasn't reacting to the thunder. When the storm got closer, she calmly got up and went into her closet.

Since then we have weathered several storms and as long as she has on her wrap, she does not exhibit the signs of stress that she used to show. In fact, on several occasions, she has calmly gone back to sleep and did not even go into the closet."

This might be a solution for your pet if you are in a similar situation.

Lisa Yackel is the administrator at Case Veterinary Hospital. She and Dr. Carla Case-McCorvey, veterinarian and owner of Case Veterinary Hospital, write a blog about pet care and families on coastalmommies.com.

READ MORE
Go to coastalmommies.com to read more blogs from Dr. Carla Case-McCorvey about the questions and concerns that families have about their pets.

Monday, July 12, 2010

blog

Anxiety Wrap's Charity Program has placed another dog in need with a wonderful loving family!  Roxie the Boxer goes from a homeless dog to much loved dog!  Your Anxiety Wrap purchase helps support the Charity Program so on behalf of Roxie and all the other animals we thank you!  Check out all the Foster Program placements at http://anxietywrap.com/anxietywrap.com/fosterprogram/ 

Saturday, July 10, 2010

Helping Your Dog During Thunderstorms

Helping Your Dog During Thunderstorms

 

Many dogs have anxiety about thunderstorms, one that can not only make storms unpleasant for them but can cause severe anxiety that can lead to damage to your house and injury to your dog. We know firsthand; our late Australian cattle dog, Alby, had a terrible fear of thunderstorms and it was awful to see her anxiety begin as a storm approached.

But there are steps you can take to make the storm more bearable for your dog. Some dog lovers recommend wraps, a technique much like swaddling a baby, to give the dog a feeling of security.

Susan Sharpe, ADPT, CDPT and veteran dog trainer, invented The Anxiety Wrap (photo, right), a stretchable fabric an animal wears like a bodysuit to provide a gentle pressure and help relieve the fear created by a thunderstorm. Sharpe offers several tips for helping your dog deal with thunderstorm anxiety:

“First, determine what part of the storm triggers your dog’s reaction.” The trainer uses the example of a dog that chases and barks at the lightning or thunder through the house. “This dog might fare better in a crate with a cover over it to help minimize the lightning while placing a radio or television on or near the crate to help with the thunder. Be sure to observe any crated dog during distress as it may increase his anxiety.”

Second, see if your dog can find a safe place where he can remain calm through the storm. “Sometimes this is the bathroom, sometimes it’s the closet. As long as the occupants of the house are okay with the location of the safe place and the dog remains calm without undergoing further trauma, this is an acceptable solution.”

If a safe place can’t be found, Sharpe suggests, “You might try attaching the leash and walking your dog through the house, asking him to perform learned behaviors or go up and down stairs, etc. Redirecting your dog’s focus helps him let go of his perceived danger. Make your house an obstacle course and give the dog juicy treats for maneuvering through, especially during a stressful situation. Gently engage your dog in whatever his favorite activity is whether it’s a game of fetch or hide and seek.” The trainer notes that some dogs just can’t be refocused on other activities, regardless of the treats, when their sense of what they perceive as danger is so strong.

And don’t give up if you don’t see improvement right away. Ms. Sharpe explains, “Any positive exercise you can do helps to create a better association between your dog and the storm.”

The most important thing, Sharpe cautions, is to remain as neutral as possible if interacting with the dog. “Often we humans will try to reassure our dogs by talking in an animated way, sitting with, hugging, and petting them,” she explains. “Unfortunately, giving them special attention even with the best of intentions can actually reinforce their fearful behavior. To a dog, this out-of-the-normal behavior can justify his anxiety. After all, something must be wrong or his human wouldn’t be making such a fuss. Also be sure to never punish the dog for his fearful behavior.”

Even better than trying to help your dog get over a thunderstorm fear is to stop it before it ever starts by working with your puppy during that first year. Along with extensive socialization, Sharpe recommends playing ball or other fun activities with the puppy whenever a storm occurs while the puppy is not showing any signs of thunderstorm fear.

Photograph courtesy The Anxiety Wrap

Friday, July 9, 2010

blog

Another great product review for the Anxiety Wrap!

Frantic dogs may need the swaddling of a wrap

Posted: July 9, 2010 - 12:19am  |  Updated: July 9, 2010 - 3:18am

At this time of year, we begin to hear stories from our clients about their dog's fear of loud noises.

Usually, the pet has exhibited these fears all year, but with our summer afternoon thunderstorms, clients have the issue more predominately on their minds.

Typically, they come to us asking for tranquilizers to calm the dog. This is not the best solution in most cases. Tranquilizers need to be given a few hours before the event and should not be given daily.

With our clients who work, the dilemma of not knowing when to use the medication becomes an issue in itself.

Summer storms are so unpredictable that it is hard to know when they might pop up. We have had clients come home to a house that looks like it has been ransacked because their dog was frantic trying to get away from a bad storm or fireworks.

My own dog is only mildly agitated by loud noises. Over the years, we have learned to put on soothing music and place her in an interior room without windows on the Fourth of July. That seems to work just fine for her.

However, my sister's dog has increasingly become a basket case when she visits. (We also have to deal with Fort Stewart during bombing exercises.)

This got me thinking how, as a new grandmother, I had been intrigued with the thoughts being presented to parents on swaddling newborns and babies.

The wraps seem to help relax and lull babies to sleep. I had seen wraps for horses and had read some on the subject in our veterinary journals. So, I recommended to my sister to try a wrap for her dog.

The Anxiety Wrap (www.anxietywrap.com) was developed by a professional dog trainer. The light pressure of the garment is meant to target points on the dog's body to give a calming effect and release tension.

My sister tried the wrap on her 11-year-old Australian Shepherd who would hide in the closet during storms or loud noises.

This is my sister's story:

"The wrap fit perfectly and she didn't mind wearing it. I got to test it out several nights later when there was a storm. The storm was some distance away and, at first, I thought maybe she was losing her hearing because she wasn't reacting to the thunder. When the storm got closer, she calmly got up and went into her closet.

Since then we have weathered several storms and as long as she has on her wrap, she does not exhibit the signs of stress that she used to show. In fact, on several occasions, she has calmly gone back to sleep and did not even go into the closet."

This might be a solution for your pet if you are in a similar situation.

Lisa Yackel is the administrator at Case Veterinary Hospital. She and Dr. Carla Case-McCorvey, veterinarian and owner of Case Veterinary Hospital, write a blog about pet care and families on coastalmommies.com.

 

Tuesday, July 6, 2010

5 our of 5 Paws product review

Dog Anxiety Wrap: Product Review to Stop the Boom Boom Fear

Friday, July 2nd, 2010

Written by: Carol Bryant

And the rockets’ red glare, the bombs bursting in air, the cocker hiding ‘neath my chair. Yes, these are the images that beckon to mind in my household this time of year and whenever a thunderstorm is looming.

My name is Carol and I have a dog who is incredibly petrified of loud sounds from outside. My little guy started out without this fear in the world. Innocent and tabula rosa, my little cocker blank slate. Then it changed on a dime, or should I say “quarter” stick.

Dexter needed to relieve himself and last 4th of July at the exact moment he was in front of the house doing his business, a HUGE host of fireworks exploded into the night sky. Bye bye innocence, hello reality. I about thought that he would jump out of his fur and leave track marks trying to get back into the house. All of my cooing and coddling him that it was “okay, baby, it’s okay” only reinforced his behavior. Bad dog mommy. Bad.

It progressed to fear of the loud thunderous storms that make their presence known here in Pennsylvania frequently during the summer months. As a dog writer and heavy traveler with Fido, certainly we needed to nip this in the bud.

So when the folks from The Anxiety Wrap company contacted FIDO Friendly to see if we were interested in a product review, I skeptically thought well, “sure why not.” I wondered though, would it really work? What’s so special about a snug fitting holistic body suit? And won’t Dexter eventually realize putting the shirt on means boom booms are about to hit the night sky?

That’s why I write about product and don’t invent it. That’s left to the good folks at The Anxiety Wrap. Susan Sharpe invented the Anxiety Wrap. She’s trained animals for over 20 years, so she has experience with this sort of thing. That put me at ease.

The process of ordering the Anxiety Wrap was really incredible, and that’s an understatement. The customer care team worked closely with me to ensure an exact fit for my Fido and to explain exactly how to use the Anxiety Wrap, the do’s and don’ts and how to maximize its efficacy.

You can learn more about those specifics here: The Anxiety Wrap

Once you’ve ordered the Anxiety Wrap and have it home, the instructions are very simple and include:

1. Put the Anxiety Wrap on 20 to 30-minutes one time only absence a storm for an introductory period.
2. The next time the Anxiety Wrap is put on the dog it will be for an actual storm. Once the Anxiety Wrap is on the dog STOP all interaction, this means NO talking, NO touching and NO direct eye contact. The dog may follow you around or may not, but do NOT interact with the dog whenever the Anxiety Wrap is on him or her.
3. The reason for no interaction is because a) your interaction may reinforce the very behavior you are wanting to extinguish and b) your interaction will raise the dog’s adrenaline level, which could then override the Anxiety Wrap’s effectiveness.
4. Once the storm has passed and the dog has stopped showing all storm related stress symptoms removed the Anxiety Wrap and you may then calmly interact with your dog.
5. Put the Anxiety Wrap on your dog bi-monthly during the storm season to prevent it from becoming a conditioner for approaching storms.
6. Watch this video on how to properly remove the Anxiety Wrap. There are other informative videos on the site too.

Well, I followed the above. Dexter is accustomed to wearing clothes for warmth and style in the fall and winter months, so he was completely accepting of apparel on his cocker body. In fact, he even hands me each paw to insert in the shirt openings. If your pooch isn’t used to clothes, you just need to be patient and work with them that wearing the shirt is a good thing. Reward them verbally and perhaps with a treat each time. Wear the shirt during calm times. Let them know it’s a good thing.

After the third wearing during non-storm periods, we decided to put it to the real test. A storm was brewing, complete with lighting. We put the shirt on a half hour before the boom booms started. This is an image (left) of the heavy panting and shaking behavior Dexter experiences at these times. He is 5 minutes into the storm in this picture.

After 20 minutes of ignoring Dexter (not an easy feat, mommy instinct kicking in), an amazing thing happened. He lay on his bed in the office and decided to take a nap. DURING THE STORM!!! This couldn’t be, could it? After 2 minutes he woke up, circled and lay back down. See?

We tried the anxiety wrap several times after that experience in different situations. I live near a park that shoots off fireworks in pre-celebration of Independence Day. He shakes at first but within 20 minutes of wearing the shirt, he is behind the chair or couch hiding but calmer. Much much calmer.

Anxiety Wrap has not only lived up to its expectations but far exceeded them and gave me the innocence back that ran through my cocker’s body before the big bad world of boom booms entered. For that, I thank them. Thinking of trying it on your Fido? Go for it and find more info about how and where to purchase and pricing by clicking here: The Anxiety Wrap

Overall Product Review: We give this product 5 out of 5 paws. Let the bombs burst in air, this Fido is unaware. Thank you, Anxiety Wrap!!!

Note: We accept no monetary compensation for reviews. Review is NOT sponsored by Anxiety Wrap and is the sole opinion of the reviewer for FIDO Friendly magazine. We welcome your feedback and comments.


Read more FIDO Friendly product reviews

 

Wednesday, June 9, 2010

Response to Puppy Class Training

As a trainer and creator of the Anxiety Wrap here is a brief answer to your question about puppies.

Ideally puppies should be enrolled in a puppy class and under the guidance of a professional and positive reinforcement trainer. Puppy development studies has taught us proper socialization starting as young as 7-weeks through week 16, can serve the puppy well for their entire life. At no other time in a dog's life is there such a natural socialization period. Missing this critical period means it is missed forever. Although puppies can still be conditioned beyond this time frame it will never again come as natural.

A quality puppy class focuses on socialization, which includes off lead playtime with other puppies, proper conditioning to people of difference gender, races, appearance, clothing, facial hair, caps, hats, glasses, difference walking styles, wheelchairs, canes, sounds, smells, textures, etc. Age appropriate confident courses, and much more. Although puppies can and certainly do learn behaviors such as sit, down, stand, leave it, attention, puppy loose lead walking, and puppy stays, these are not the most important areas to be focused on during a puppy socialization class, but they may be included as part of the course.

Sincerely,

Susan Sharpe
sus@anxietywrap.com
www.anxietywrap.com
260.344.1217

Monday, May 10, 2010

Getting Started

Welcome to the launch of The Anxiety Wrap blog! I'm thrilled to be able to communicate with all of you on a more personal level. My goal of this blog is to provide training tips and case histories from actual clients based on your feedback. Our clients have told us that they not only enjoy, but also pick up good tips when they read about how other people's dogs have worked through issues that are similar to theirs. My hope in sharing these case histories is that they will of some help, but I need you to promise that you'll remember every dog is an individual. What works for one dog in one situation, may not work for another dog.

I'll be writing book & product reviews/suggestions, and sometimes I'd just like to share the daily progress one of my client dogs is making in overcoming his/her difficult issue(s). All of this will be occurring on a weekly, if not more frequent, basis.

I'd also like to start an "Anxiety Wrap Dog Of The Month" contest! But there will be more details on that forthcoming.

For those of you who aren't familiar with me, I'm Susan Sharpe, CDPT-KA, APDT, the inventor of The Anxiety Wrap. I've trained animals for over 20 years and am owner of Animals Plus, LLC and Co-owner of Canine Companion - a dog training, daycare, and overnight doggie resort facility - and currently serve as an expert witness for canine behavior litigation. I firmly believe in giving back and in addition to providing donations to rescue groups and shelters, we also run The Anxiety Wrap Charity Foster Program where we rehabilitate and provide foster/permanent homes for abandoned animals.

We have a lot of other ideas for this blog! For example, we have so many wonderful partners - both individuals, such as Tracie Hotchner, Pet expert, author and host of radio shows, Cat Chat® and Dog Talk® - and retailers, and we'd like you to have the opportunity to learn a little about them. So once a month, we'd like to put a spotlight on one of our partners and have them share their favorite dog experience and other information with you.

I'd like to hear your thoughts and suggestions because this blog is for YOU! So please email me at susan@anxietywrap.com and let me know what you think!